Get a 62% Increase on Three Big Exercises

In the realm of strength training and muscle building ‘intensity’ is everything. Well, almost everything.

The human body grows more muscle in response to higher intensity work. Nothing else can trigger that response. Better nutrition won’t trigger it. The latest supplement won’t trigger it. Even drugs can’t trigger it. While all of the above can play a supporting role once growth has been stimulated, they are of no value in actually triggering muscle growth in the first place.

And, my friends, therein lays my 15-year obsession with generating maximum muscular intensity. Without it, you’re just doing busywork in the gym.

And who has time for busywork?

I research and I measure and when I find something worthwhile I tell you about it. That’s why I’ve been advocating the use of lifting hooks for years. I don’t make lifting hooks and I don’t sell them. But I have a friend who makes some heavy-duty hooks for my kind of lifting.

Hooks help with heavy pulling exercises. The big ones are lat pulldowns, deadlifts and barbell shrugs. These are big, powerful muscle groups (latissimus dorsi, erector spinae and trapezius) and they represent 30% of the exercises I recommend as part of the highest intensity workout routine.

These three muscle groups create a V-taper in the torso, reduce low back pain and a give a “buff” athletic look to the shoulder girdle. Those are all highly desirable benefits and using lifting hooks can (I tested this) generate 62% more intensity in these exercises. Right out of the box, on Day One.

To me, it’s a no brainer. With everything I have invested in getting to the gym and doing my best possible workout, why would I leave a 62% increase sitting on a shelf somewhere? I don’t want any of my workouts to be busywork. I want measurable results. I hope you feel the same way.

Train with your brain,

  

 








In the spirit of well-rounded self-improvement and spending fitness time wisely and efficiently, this Static Contraction article was brought to you by the Latin proverb:


Carpe diem
"Seize the day." Horace











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